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How To Overcome Cognitive Biases and Make Better Decisions (Or, "What I Learned from the Holiday Party")

By Joe Shaffner |   Dec 09, 2016

As humans, we make decisions most of our waking hours. Left or right? Chicken or fish? Tide or Tide with whitening power? Speak up or stay quiet? Take the job or pass on it? New city? New house? Just in this short list, we can see that some of the decisions we make are mundane, while others may be a matter of life and death.

Due Tomorrow, Do Tomorrow: Getting Leverage on Procrastination

By Joe Shaffner |   Sep 05, 2016

 

Time-Management series: Own Your Time - Don't Let Time Own You (Part Three)

By Joe Shaffner |   Apr 20, 2016

6 Steps to Solve Big Problems with Small Solutions

By Jason Abell |   Apr 06, 2016

Today's article is about problem-solving when things appear to be overwhelming.


16 years ago, I had just made a huge move in my mortgage banking practice. My career started 7 years earlier when I was hired as an assistant to 2 high-level sales people who taught me the ropes and helped me get my life off the ground as a contributing person in the workforce. Before long I was on my own slinging loans in the suburbs of Washington DC for a smaller regional bank. I started making some inroads, built some key relationships, and felt that I was ready to join an organization with a nationwide banking presence, so I made the decision to join Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. My first day was Monday, April 3rd, 2000. I walked in the front door smiling from ear to ear. I was excited. I was bright-eyed and bushy-tailed and ready to get after it at my new company.


 

April 17th. A mere two weeks later would find me sitting behind my desk at 6:30 a.m. with my face in my hands, simply overwhelmed.

Epic Lessons for Meeting Tough Goals at Work and in Life

By Edith "Edie" Raphael, PhD |   Mar 09, 2016

In 2013, polar explorers Ben Saunders and Tarka L’Herpiniere became the first people to survive a human powered round-trip journey from the coastline of Antarctica to the South Pole and back— a journey of 1800 miles across one of most inhospitable terrains on Earth. The trip was called the Scott Expedition, named after the leading explorer who died (along with five others) in 1910 attempting the same trek.

The Power Of Starting Something New

By Steve Scanlon |   Oct 29, 2015

When hosting a Rewire Workshop, I often ask groups “how long does it take to break a habit?” A spattering of attendees will yell out anything from 5 days to 100 days. I suppose these answers are based upon the most recent book they read. And there are a lot of books out there on habits. How to change them, get rid of them, recognize the power in them, etc.  Our habits seem to be all the rage.  A brief search in Amazon left me smiling at the idea that there are hundreds of books all aimed at helping us create or somehow dismantle a habit or two.

Does Your Work Depend On You Being Right? (WHAT ARE THOSE?!)

By Steve Longan |   Oct 07, 2015

In today’s Wireboard article, I want to:

How Can You Tell When Familiarity Is Keeping You From Positive Growth?

By Steve Longan |   Jul 29, 2015

One common response we get from people after we help them to see their Lizard Brain is “Thank you for making me aware of my Lizard Brain…now how do I get rid of it?” The surprising answer we give people is "You can't kill the Lizard Brain -- nor would you want to.” And we're serious -- the Lizard Brain does some amazing things for us.

A Fun Exercise About Growth, Communication, Creativity And The Power Of Bricks

By Steve Longan |   Jul 02, 2015

I get to do a lot of interesting stuff for my work with Rewire. For instance, I wrote a few weeks ago about some eye-opening research I was doing on making better decisions. One of the other fun things I get to do with Rewire is design exercises for us to use in workshops, keynotes, retreats, etc., and today’s article is about one such exercise.  We’ll talk about: (1) How the exercise is setup, (2) what almost always happens with people as they do this exercise, and (3) what this means for sustainably growing our work.

If Only We Would Accept Some Inconvenience

By Steve Scanlon |   May 06, 2015

The human brain desires ease. None of us is exempt from that fact.

You’ll Grow Faster If You Can Be Wrong Every Now And Then

By Steve Longan |   Apr 15, 2015

As Steve wrote last week, we’ve been thinking a lot lately about the concept of “risk” in our work. And so, as Rewire’s “R&D Fonzi” (my unofficial title), I get to plow headfirst into whatever I can get my hands on that will help individuals and teams understand how risk is impacting their work. I’ve gotten to spend hours and hours reading and thinking about things like judgement heuristics, game theory, prospect theory, etc. Eventually, I’ll bring my findings to the team and we’ll construct training workshops, team-building exercises, and tools for clients to use in order to turn a specific approach to risk into a competitive advantage for their work.

This Article Is Risk-y

By Steve Scanlon |   Apr 08, 2015

I’ve been spending a bit of time lately thinking about how our brains deal with risk.  In a nutshell, my research has led me to understand that most of us cope with risk constantly  — to varying degrees of success.

Have You Tried Asking "So What?"

By Steve Longan |   Mar 11, 2015

Author's note: This idea originated with "Rewire Advisory Sage At Large" Lindon Crow. For those of you that don't know Lindon, he's one of our favorite people at Rewire.  He owns a company called Productive Learning, and his company's workshops are truly transformative experiences that are well worth your time if you have a chance to attend. This idea originally came from him and has captivated my attention over the past few months. So, much thanks to you, Lindon!

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A True Story About Authentic Growth And “Good To Great”

By Steve Longan |   Feb 05, 2015

Julee-anne Bell lives in Brisbane, Australia with her husband and their two teenage sons.  And today’s Wireboard article is a story about her and her family. More specifically, it’s a story about their “arms.”

The Difficult We Do Immediately And The Impossible Takes A Little Longer

By Jason Abell |   Nov 19, 2014

It was Fall 1979 and my dad and I had just finished the last leaf raking and lawn mowing of the year. This meant it was time to empty the gas out of the mower's tank and put it away for the winter. But we had a problem: the little handheld pump on the syphon that we normally used for such jobs was busted. Turning the mower upside down to pour the gas out was really not a viable option and leaving the gas in the tank for the Winter would mean a non-starting mower come Spring (since the gas would go stale by then).

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