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Management Coaching Culture Boosts Employee Retention

By Stefanie Sample |   Nov 06, 2018

Don’t Mismanage Your Best Assets

Employees are the most important assets of any company. There’s a problem that many organizations have, though. When they invest in employees, there is a tendency to think of those individuals statistically.

 

If you want self-motivated, effective employees to stick around, you can’t treat them like numbers. Maximizing retention means maximizing employee satisfaction, even employee fulfillment, and making them feel valued. This is done better through coaching than through management which may tend to treat workers like numbers. You’ve got to be a coach, not a human resource manager with a mindset to treat employees like numbers. To condense it down: you want to be a leader, not a boss.

 

There’s a reason HR doesn’t generally manage loan officers or salespeople. They additionally aren’t often involved in managing teams where an entrepreneurial edge is necessary. Why? Fear of losing a job doesn’t motivate a person to excellence; it motivates them into being invisible. HR managers don’t exclusively hire and fire people, but this is what takes up a lot of their time. Accordingly, fear tactics predominate employee perceptions of some HR managers.

 

As an executive, you cannot afford to think in a way that is rooted in fear tactics. Such thinking builds a wall between you and workers. You don’t want a wall, you want a relationship—employees are the most important assets of your company, after all. The best way to enable them toward being profitable is to have a coaching mindset.

 

Coaching Toward Excellence

Consider a mortgage brokerage. Many executives in such organizations have loan officers operating in a strongly entrepreneurial capacity. The executives need to see certain numbers, the loan officers are doing their best to enable the right loans for the right people to hit those numbers, and to experience personal gain.

 

Already, someone working as a loan officer has reached a point where they’re trying to do their best. Now say an executive finds a loan officer is coming in “under par” regarding quota. An executive has a few options here: they can sit down on a one-on-one basis and try to motivate the employee by stoking the fires of consequence…or they can act in a leadership capacity as a sort of coach. The latter method will likely work better, sometimes the former is taken too often.

 

It’s not only loan officers that want to win the “game” of profitable operation. Incentives and bonuses among any team will help drive them toward their goals, as will effective coaching. If such workers aren’t hitting necessary numbers, it’s likely not deliberate. If an executive were to treat them like a malfunctioning machine, rather than a human, they shouldn’t be surprised if they see little to no improvement even while a quota lag persists. A machine is static and uncreative; a person is vibrant and imaginative. If your efforts are already emphasizing this aspect of individuality, excellent! If they aren’t, it may be worthwhile to optimize your approach.

 

Working with a team of coaches comes in handy in such situations. Employees are going to experience stress, and will likely feel their job has little purpose in the grand scheme of things. But treat them like people who are responsible, creative beings, and you give them inner strength to transcend boundaries, developing creativity to meet quotas.

 

Human Nature

You must exploit empathy, and this is a learning process. A coach may be “in your face”, push you harder, and motivate you in ways you didn’t think possible—but you understand why they’re doing so. It’s part of “the game”. Which game? Well, the game of selling, the game of outreach, the game of success.

 

Athletes love coaches because the coach-given passion which drives players is informed by desire. Good coaches transform desire into motivation. This has a balance. Sometimes a coach does get a bit confrontational and direct, because sometimes the only way to facilitate desire and motivation is through a swift, frank, indisputable address of reality.

 

In terms of a professional atmosphere, it’s going to differ per employee, and again, you can’t treat each employee as “one-size-fits-all” machine component. The key is facilitating desire as naturally as possible. Desire comes from within, and surfeits outward effort.

 

Effective Executive Coaching Maximizes Retention

An executive coaching their team can tell when a loan officer is under too much stress, or a seller needs to get re-motivated after a down month. Instead of berating these individuals, the good coach sits down with his team members, lets them speak, lets them be heard, lets them be recognized, and offers alternatives, advice, comfort, or reproof as necessary. The key is facilitating desire, which equals motivation. Proper action in such scenarios is situationally dependent.

 

Reduced stress, recognition, and humanity are better motivators than fear and might. The key is learning to coach—to lead—rather than to manage. Managers deal with numbers, coaches deal with people. Personability yields retention.

 

Learn to coach, learn to lead, and employees will stick around because they want to—because they desire to; because they recognize they’re a valued member of your team. If you haven’t looked into a coaching approach, you may want to consider it.

 

 

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How One-on-One Business Coaching Gets Results

By Stefanie Sample |   May 08, 2018

Nobody likes being told what to do.

 

You don’t have to be a neuroscientist to understand this. It’s just part of the human experience: once someone gives us a specific task and tells us we must accomplish it, our desire to do the task almost completely evaporates. Even if it’s something we wanted to do in the first place!

 

Rewire Live Series: Control

By Steve Scanlon |   Jan 12, 2018

Quick video on control today.  As a concept, I think this is pretty simple: whenever we lack control, we feel at some level that our survival is threatened and we start reacting in all sorts of ways to try to regain control - or even just the illusion of control.

Things I Learned from Listening to My Procrastination

By Steve Scanlon |   Oct 26, 2017

Last night before falling asleep, I had a brief and final thought about going for a good run in the morning. But the next morning, lo and behold, I wake, do some meditation, get to some work, and then realize that I have a headache. I almost felt queasy. I don’t really know why, but at about 8:00 the little man inside of me began to create reasons not to go for that run I had whole-heartedly committed to just hours before.  You know that little person, right?  He or she is the one inside of all of us crafting all manners of excuses for us not to do something.

I’ve Used This Boat Metaphor to Meet Challenges and Drive Growth for Teams

By Edith "Edie" Raphael, PhD |   May 02, 2017

This past year, I’ve been consulting for a company and one of its contractors on a big project. Since this big project requires close coordination, a large part of my work has become helping the two teams work better together. And this has not always been easy. The scope of their project is massive with matching stakes for success and failure. The deadlines are aggressive. The stress level is consistently high.

1 Powerful Habit in 8 Steps: The Mechanics of the Hand-Written Note

By Jason Abell |   Mar 15, 2017

A month ago, I wrote an article on the power of the hand-written note. The emails, phone calls, and conversations I have received as a result of writing that article have been many (even a few hand-written notes in return!). And the stories that I have received about people both writing and receiving hand-written notes have been especially beautiful. I have heard about relationships that have been restored or rekindled, gratitude that has been given and received, increased sales that have occurred, and yes, even suicides that have been prevented — all because of someone taking the time to sit down and spend a few minutes writing a note and connecting in a meaningful way with another human being. I give a huge thumbs up to all that activity.

Entrepenuer Magazine Ranks Rewire One of the Top Entrepreneurial Companies in America

By Jason Abell |   Nov 30, 2016

Hey everybody, we made it onto a list!

Purpose Is More Than A "One-And-Done" Activity

By Steve Scanlon |   Feb 10, 2016

 

Venn Diagrams: Answering the Foundational Question of How “Work” & “Life” Are Related

By Steve Longan |   Nov 18, 2015

In today’s Wireboard article, I’d like to utilize one of my favorite teaching devices: the Venn diagram. Venn diagrams are a great way for simply illustrating various concepts and their relationships to one another. So, whenever I have an opportunity to explain something by using a Venn diagram, I’ll take it!

The Power Of Starting Something New

By Steve Scanlon |   Oct 29, 2015

When hosting a Rewire Workshop, I often ask groups “how long does it take to break a habit?” A spattering of attendees will yell out anything from 5 days to 100 days. I suppose these answers are based upon the most recent book they read. And there are a lot of books out there on habits. How to change them, get rid of them, recognize the power in them, etc.  Our habits seem to be all the rage.  A brief search in Amazon left me smiling at the idea that there are hundreds of books all aimed at helping us create or somehow dismantle a habit or two.

Lessons On Procrastination

By Steve Scanlon |   Aug 26, 2015

 

What's The Smallest Step You Can Take Today? (The Land Of Lost Songs)

By Steve Longan |   Aug 12, 2015

"What Does Rewire Do?" Let Me Tell You! (Video)

By Steve Scanlon |   Aug 06, 2015

 

How Can You Tell When Familiarity Is Keeping You From Positive Growth?

By Steve Longan |   Jul 29, 2015

One common response we get from people after we help them to see their Lizard Brain is “Thank you for making me aware of my Lizard Brain…now how do I get rid of it?” The surprising answer we give people is "You can't kill the Lizard Brain -- nor would you want to.” And we're serious -- the Lizard Brain does some amazing things for us.

LeBron James, Leadership And Investing In The Work Of Others

By Steve Longan |   May 27, 2015

Today’s Wireboard is a bit of a twofer. We’ll always talk about approaches to growing our work - but today’s article also has a healthy dose of NBA basketball mixed in. So if you've been looking to improve your work and read about basketball at the same time, today's your lucky day! If, on the other hand, you despise NBA basketball, feel free to forward this on to someone you don't like very much.

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